rogerfedererfan

This blog covers all things RF. It is dedicated to my dearest friend and avid FedFan @EfieZac. May she RIP 💙

Rankings

Roger Federer’s records in ATP rankings and points

All Time Record Holder

  1. Concluding on November 4, 2012, Federer has been ranked world no. 1 for a record total of 302 weeks (three separate periods), surpassing Pete Sampras record (286 weeks, eleven separate periods). The only other male players to rank no. 1 for more than 200 weeks in total are Ivan Lendl (270 weeks, eight separate periods) and Jimmy Connors (268 weeks, 9 separate periods). Only Martina Navratilova (331 weeks) and Steffi Graf (377 weeks) have spent more weeks as no. 1 than Federer.
  2. Federer is the first player, male or female, to be ranked world no. 1 for at least four consecutive (non-calendar) years (February 2, 2004 – August 17, 2008).
  3. Federer is the first male player to be ranked no. 1 for 300 weeks.
  4. Federer is the first player, male or female, to rank no. 1 for more than 200 consecutive weeks.
  5. Federer is the first player, male or female, to be ranked and seeded no. 1 at three Olympics (consecutive as well as overall), at Athens 2004, Beijing 2008 and London 2012, breaking the previous record of one.
  6. Until losing the world no. 1 ranking to Rafael Nadal on August 18, 2008, Federer was the top ranked player for a record 237 consecutive weeks, surpassing the previous record of 160 consecutive weeks held by Connors. 237 consecutive weeks is the record for both males and females surpassing the previous record of 186 consecutive weeks held by Steffi Graf.
  7. Federer was no. 1 for 237 weeks during the first period (February 2, 2004 – August 17, 2008), 48 weeks during the second period (July, 6 2009 – June 6, 2010) and 17 weeks during the third period (July 9, 2012 – November 4, 2012).
  8. Federer is the first player, male or female, to rank no. 1 for 285 weeks in total in only two periods.
  9. Federer is the first and only player to finish the year as a top two player in the world for eight consecutive years (2003–10) and total ten years (2003-10, 2012, 2014).
  10. Federer was ranked in the top two in the world for a record 346 consecutive weeks (November 17, 2003 – July 4, 2011).
  11. Federer has been ranked in the top two for a record 471 total weeks as of May 9, 2016 and he has also been ranked in the top three for a record 628 total weeks also as of July 17, 2017.
  12. Federer is the only man to reach all four Grand Slam finals as both the no. 1 ranked player (AO ’06, FO ’06, W ’04, USO ’04) and the no. 2 ranked player (AO ’04, FO ’09, W ’09, USO ’08). He has won each of the four Grand Slams while ranked no. 2, and three of the four Grand Slams while ranked no. 1 (with the French Open being the exception).
  13. Federer has been seeded 1st in 23 Grand Slam tournaments, being 18 of those consecutively. Also, he has been seeded 1st or 2nd in 30 Grand Slams in a row and has been the 1st, 2nd or 3rd seed in all Grand Slams since the 2003 US Open. He has both won and been runner-up at tournaments seeded 1st, 2nd and 3rd.
  14. Federer is the only active player to be ranked in the year end top 10 for fourteen consecutive years.
  15. Either Federer or Rafael Nadal was ranked no. 1 for a record 387 consecutive weeks from February 2, 2004 (7 years, 5 months and 3 weeks). This consecutive streak was broken when Nadal lost the no. 1 ranking to Novak Djokovic on July 4, 2011.
  16. Either Federer or Rafael Nadal was in the top 2 of the ATP for a record consecutive 9 years, 4 months and 2 weeks, from November 17, 2003 when Federer reached no. 2 till March 25, 2013, when Murray took over the no. 2 ranking from Federer.
    1. A new mini streak started again from April 22, 2013, with Federer returning to no. 2 again. Murray took the ranking back on May 13, 2013. However, the streak started once more when Nadal became ranked no. 2 ahead of Murray as of August 19, 2013. The total before that week stood at 9 years, 5 months and 1 week.
    2. Nadal ended 2013 ranked as the no. 1 player in the world. But in 2014, as Nadal’s ranking dropped, Federer’s rose. Finally, at the Shanghai Rolex Masters 2014 Roger moved back into the Top 2, swapping spots with Nadal. This new streak, which started in August 19, 2013 continued for exactly 2 years till August 17, 2015 when Roger finally fell to no. 3 as Murray took his spot at no. 2 once more. The streak for the total number of weeks for either Federer or Nadal being in the top 2 ended at 11 years, 5 months and 1 week.
    3. But only a week later, on August 24, 2015, Federer reclaimed the #2 ranking by winning the Cincinnati 2015 Masters. Thus the streak started yet again but ended quickly on October 12, 2015 when Murray swapped places with Federer once more and Federer dropped to #3 in the world. The streak for the total number of weeks for either Federer or Nadal being in the top 2 ended at that point at 11 years and 7 months.
    4. On November 2, 2015 Federer and Murray swapped places yet again when Federer defended his Basel title and reached the #2 ranking; the streak started once more. But again, only a week later, after a poor result at Bercy, Federer dropped back to #3 and the streak stopped once more. The streak for the total number of weeks for either Federer or Nadal being in the top 2 ended at that point at 11 years, 7 months and 1 week.
    5. On May 9, 2016, Federer got back the #2 ranking for 1 week during the Rome Masters but lost it to Murray again the following week. The streak for the total number of weeks for either Federer or Nadal being in the top 2 thus ended at 11 years, 7 months and 2 weeks.
  17. Federer held the record for the largest ATP point lead in 2006 prior to the doubling of point values.

Record Tied

  1. Federer is second of three men to regain the year-end no. 1 ranking (2009) along with Ivan Lendl (1989) and Rafael Nadal (2010, 2013). Nadal is the only player to regain it twice, in 2010 and 2013.
  2. Federer is the third man to hold the year-end no. 1 ranking for at least five years (2004–07, 2009) after Jimmy Connors (1974–78) and Pete Sampras (1993–98).
  3. Federer is the fourth man to hold the year-end no. 1 ranking for at least four consecutive years (2004–07) after Connors (1974–78), John McEnroe (1981–84), and Sampras (1993–98)
  4. Federer is the fifth man to be ranked world no. 1 every week during a calendar year (2005–07). The others are Connors, Lendl, Sampras, and Lleyton Hewitt. Federer is the only man to do so for three consecutive years (2005–07).
  5. Federer is the fourth male player to be no. 1 for more than 5 years (260 weeks) in total. The first male player to pass the 5 year mark was Connors, followed by Lendl and Sampras. These four players combined have ruled the ATP Top ranking for almost 22 years out of 39 years. (Ilie Năstase was the first player to rank no. 1 on August 23, 1973).

In The Record Books

  1. Following his Round 1 Wimbledon 2013 loss, on July 8, 2013, Federer moved out of the Top 4 ranking and was ranked no. 5 for the first time since July 7, 2003, exactly 10 years and 1 day from when he won his first Wimbledon title. His record of 522 consecutive weeks in the Top 4 is second only to Jimmy Connors’ 651 consecutive weeks.
  2. Following his QF loss at Cincinnati, on August 19, 2013, Federer moved out of the Top 5 for the first time since February 17, 2003 and was ranked no. 7. This ended his streak of being in the Top 5 at 549 weeks (548 consecutive). Again, he is second only to Jimmy Connors’ 705 weeks (658 consecutive).
  3. From Cincinnati 2013 onwards he kept shuffling between ranks 5, 6 and 7. Ultimately Federer ended 2013 being ranked 6 in the world. This ended his streak of ending the year being ranked inside the Top 3, the Top 4 and the Top 5 at 10 consecutive years from 2003 – 2012.
  4. Federer is behind Connors in the record for consecutive years in the Top 4 and Top 5. Connors was in the Top 4 and Top 5 for 14 years. Federer is in second place behind Connors for Top 4 and Top 5 with 12 years total in each category.
  5. Federer’s streak of being inside the Top 10 at the end of the year came to an end in 2016 when he prematurely had to end his season due to injury. His personal record is at 14 years which puts him in 2nd place behind the joint Agassi/Connors record of 16 years in the top 10.
  6. After the tough year of 2013, Federer fared far better in 2014 and started to turn things around. Following his run at Indian Wells 2014 which ended with him as the runner-up, Federer moved back into the Top 5 on March 17, 2014 after being out of it for 30 weeks.
  7. Immediately after Indian Wells, following his run at the Sony Open Tennis 2014 in Miami where he lost in the QFs, Federer moved back into the Top 4 on March 31, 2014 after being out of it for 38 weeks.
  8. At Wimbledon 2014 he reached the finals. As a result, Roger moved back into the Top 3 on July 7, 2014 after being out of it for 51 weeks. He also regained his status as the #1 ranked Swiss player.
  9. After Shanghai Rolex Masters 2014 Roger moved back into the Top 2 and became the #2 player in the world, overtaking Rafa Nadal. Roger had dropped out of the Top 2 back on May 13, 2013 and after 17 months he finally regained that ranking again on October 13, 2014.
  10. His year end ranking for 2014 was #2. However, he pushed Novak Djokovic to the very brink in the race to Year End #1 ranking right till the end. Novak has to wait till his own final round robin match win at the ATP World Tour Finals to be able to confirm his #1 ranking.
  11. Roger lost the #2 ranking for a week from August 17, 2015 to August 24, 2015 and then gained it back, only to lose it again to Murray on October 12, 2015. He gained it for one more week when he won the Swiss Indoors Basel title on November 2, 2015 but lost it on November 9, 2015 after a poor showing at Bercy whereas Murray reached the final. He thus ended the year ranked #3 although this wasn’t finalized till the final of the ATP World Tour Finals that year.
  12. Roger had to prematurely cancel the rest of the 2016 season due to injury. He made the announcement on 26th July 2016 and with that announcement, many streaks and records came to an end, including those concerning his rankings. He dropped from #3 to #4 on August 22, 2016 losing points from Cincy where he was the defending champion from 2015. Following the US Open when he failed to defend his Finalist points, his ranking was in free fall. He finally ended the year ranked #16.
  13. Even though he started off at the 2017 Australian Open ranked #17, by winning the Slam, he jumped up 7 spots to become ranked #10 by the end of that tournament, on January 30th, 2017. He jumped up one more spot to #9 on February 13th, 2017.
  14. Roger went on to win Indian Wells which caused him to jump up once more to become ranked #6 on March 20th, 2017. He won the Miami Open as well, two weeks after Indian Wells. This win allowed him to break back into the top 4. He became ranked #4 on April 3rd, 2017.
  15. He lost his Top 4 spot as he took the entire clay season off. By the time he started the grass season he was ranked #5 and that ranking continued throughout the season even though he was seeded #4 at Wimbledon. With his Wimbledon 2017 win, he jumped 2 spots and became ranked 3rd. This was the first time he had been back to the Top 3 since August 22nd, 2016.
  16. At the end of the 2017 US Open, on September 11, 2017 he rose up one more spot to become ranked #2. This was the first time he had been back to the Top 2 since May 9th, 2016 when he got that ranking for just one week.
  17. Roger ended 2017 ranked #2. This was the first year he ended the year ranked in the Top 2 since 2014. It was his 11th year of ending the year ranked in the Top 2 (2003-2010, 2012, 2014 and 2017).

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